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  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • SOSU Aarhus
  • LOCATION: AARHUS, DK
  • CLIENT: SOCIAL AND HEALTH CARE COLLEGE AARHUS
  • SIZE: 11.800 m² NEW BUILDING
  • YEAR: 2013
  • STATUS: COMPETITION PROPOSAL – CLOSED
  • ARCHITECT: CEBRA
  • LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT: MIST+GRASSAT
  • TURN-KEY CONTRACTOR: A. ENGGAARD
  • ENGINEER: TRI-CONSULT

Our proposal for Aarhus’ new social and health care college can be divided into two overall types of spaces: On one side regular and well-defined spaces that flank the atrium and on the other side organic learning environments that emerge on and between the sweeping balconies in the centre of the building. This dual strategy provides a high degree of adaptability in terms of different types of teaching by means of spatial diversity and variation.

The central atrium space is shaped by soft organic curves, which shift contrapuntally to each other – like sinus waves oscillating out of tune. These shifts create bridges across the space, which connect the building internally and reduce walking distances. In addition, this means that the atrium only in selected spots is experienced in its full height across all three floors. Despite this seemingly simple system of layered wavy lines the building provides an enormous spatial variation that is able to meet the individual needs in a diverse group of users.

As a first hint about the vivid and undulating universe of the interior the building’s rectangular volume is “squeezed” in selected sections, marking areas of particular significance and creating transitions between the inside and the outside. The site’s qualities and potentials are made use of in a formal interplay with the building’s architecture. Some of the interior’s wavy lines break through the façade and divide the site, so that building and landscape are echoing each other.